The Inspiration For The Musical Madman: Ludwig Von Beethoven

It took me years to finally see something interesting about someone that people hear often, yet know little about, which is the inspiration for the musical madman. I call him Ludwig von Beethoven.

People use his music in commercials and in movies. People have been known to whistle his work, yet never know where it came from.

I laughingly tell people that Germany brought us something great, outside of the Great War and the Austrian man who ruined brush mustaches. It brought us great music.

Ode to Joy provided Hans Gruber a type of elevator music for his own criminal magnum opus. Alex de Large supposedly heard it without music playing and he found “Ludwig B” to be a constant in his everyday life. Eroica is used in certain funerals.

Although I don’t find myself a conductor to madness, I found solace in traffic when I put on his works using my piddly car stereo.

I had read into a few articles that mentioned the weird life he had lived and the tangled relationships he had, especially among family. His increasing deafness, coupled with poor social abilities, gave birth to that. (Completely looking past alcoholism and illnesses).

I had thought about who might have been a modern day Beethoven of sorts. I made an argument that Dave Mustaine from Megadeth might make the nut. He has an insane attention to detail and a musical mind that leans toward a classical way. Mustaine has had his share of work disagreements and relationship fails. Noted that the Motor City Madman, aka Ted Nugent has done a bit of the same.

To end this poorly linked atrocity, I made note that Beethoven was buried on this date in 1827 in Vienna, Austria.

It took me years to finally see something interesting about someone that people hear often, yet know little about, which is the inspiration for the musical madman. I call him Ludwig von Beethoven.

People use his music in commercials and in movies. People have been known to whistle his work, yet never know where it came from.

I laughingly tell people that Germany brought us something great, outside of the Great War and the Austrian man who ruined brush mustaches. It brought us great music.

Ode to Joy provided Hans Gruber a type of elevator music for his own criminal magnum opus. Alex de Large supposedly heard it without music playing and he found “Ludwig B” to be a constant in his everyday life. Eroica is used in certain funerals.

Although I don’t find myself a conductor to madness, I found solace in traffic when I put on his works using my piddly car stereo.

I had read into a few articles that mentioned the weird life he had lived and the tangled relationships he had, especially among family. His increasing deafness, coupled with poor social abilities, gave birth to that. (Completely looking past alcoholism and illnesses).

I had thought about who might have been a modern day Beethoven of sorts. I made an argument that Dave Mustaine from Megadeth might make the nut. He has an insane attention to detail and a musical mind that leans toward a classical way. Mustaine has had his share of work disagreements and relationship fails. Noted that the Motor City Madman, aka Ted Nugent has done a bit of the same.

To end this poorly linked atrocity, I made note that Beethoven was buried on this date in 1827 in Vienna, Austria.

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5 Responses to The Inspiration For The Musical Madman: Ludwig Von Beethoven

  1. Pingback: The Inspiration For The Musical Madman: Ludwig Von Beethoven — Mogadishu Matt | Vermont Folk Troth

  2. Ah Beethoven.

    My personal rankings of his symphonies goes 6,9,3,7,5, although 3, 7, and 5 all change order, depending on my mood.

    They’ll play Beethoven’s 3rd’s 2nd movement at my funeral.

    And yes, 19th century German culture is great! One of the best in history. From Romantic painting to Beethoven to Wagner to Brahms. So good.

    It’s a shame Germans today are all self-loathing because of 12 horrible years of history. History is a long, long thing. Not mere years.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Pingback: FreeMatt in Review: 3-28 to 4-1 (2022) | Mogadishu Matt

  4. I LOVE Beethoven. Glad to hear you’re a fan, too, Matt! I wrote a piece about the great composer—the great madman!—on the occasion of his 250th birthday back in 2020: https://theportlypolitico.com/2020/12/16/happy-250th-birthday-beethoven/

    Liked by 1 person

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